In this post, I will use a generic model for phone numbers that has a 3-digit prefix and a running width of 7 digits.

To start, I will fix the prefix to be 123, so P1=1 P2=2, P3=3. The 7-digit running numbers will give us 10,000,000 numbers starting from 0,000,000 up to 9,999,999

Again, we will name each digit from the running numbers as n1, n2, .. n7.

Class 1 numbers: Examples of unique patterns

  • Full ascending: (1 instance per 10,000,000)
    • 123-4567890
  • Ascending running: (4 per 10,000,000)
    • 123-012 3456
    • 123-123 4567
    • 123-234 5678
    • 123-345 6789
  • Descending running: (4 per 10,000,000)
    • 123-987 6543
    • 123-876 5432
    • 123-765 4321
    • 123-654 3210
  • Million pattern: (9 per 10,000,000)
    • 123-a0000000 [ a ≠ 0 ]
  • Repeated prefix: (10 per 10,000,000)
    • 123-123 a 123 123
  • Repeated inverted prefix: (10 per 10,000,000)
    • 123-321 a 123 321
  • 7 Repeated digits: (9 per 10,000,000)
    • 123-aaa aa aa [ a ≠ p3 ]
  • 8 Repeated digits: (1 per 10,000,000)
    • 123-333 33 33
  • Named numbers: (counts depend on the name)
    • 123-Mohamed = 123-6642633 (1 per 10,000,000)
    • 123-Ahmed xx = 123-24633 xx (100 per 10,000,000)
    • 123-Mark xxx = 123-6275 xxx (1,000 per 10,000,000)

Class 2 numbers: Examples for the 2 digits, adjacent sets

  • 6A1B pattern: (18 per 10,000,000), [b ≠ a]
    • 123-aaa aaa b
    • 123-b aaa aaa
  • 5A2B pattern: (162 per 10,000,000, [b ≠ a]
    • 123-aaa aa bb
    • 123-bb aaa aa
  • 4A3B pattern: (1,458 per 10,000,000), [b ≠ a]
    • 123-aaaa bbb
    • 123-bbb aaaa
  • 4A3B alternate pattern: (1,458 per 10,000,000), [b ≠ a]
    • 123-ab ab ab a
    • 123-ba ba ba b
  • Ascending twins: assume z = y+1, y = x+1. (144 per 10,000,000)
    • 123-ax ay az a
    • 123-a ax ay az

Class 3 numbers: Examples of the 2 digits, non adjacent numbers

  • 6A1B split: (45 per 10,000,000), [b ≠ a]
    • 123-ab aaa aa
    • 123-aab aa aa
    • 123-aaa b aaa
    • 123-aa aa baa
    • 123-aaa aa ba
  • 5A2B split:(1,134 per 10,000,000), [b ≠ a]
    • 123-abb aa aa
    • 123-ab ab aaa
    • 123-a baa baa
    • 123-ab aaa ba
    • 123-ab aaa ab
    • 123-aa bb aaa
    • 123-a ab ab aa
    • 123-aab aab a
    • 123-aab aaab
    • 123-aaa bb aa
    • 123-aaa ba ba
    • 123-a aab aab
    • 123-aa aa bba
    • 123-aa a ab ab

As you can see, the more different digits we add, the more variations we can generate. We may also play with relations between numbers by adding one or more relations of the below:

  • Ascending / descending
  • twins (e.g. aa bb cc …)
  • Multiples (e.g. 15 20 25)

In the next blog post, I will take some samples and start building an Excel generator to generate lists of numbers in a given pattern. this is actually the base of building the integrated dial classification module.

Good bye for now..

Sample Numeric Patterns
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